Knife blades from Ragnar

Index

I offer knife blades, and other bits and pieces, separately for those who would like to build their own knives. These are the same high quality blades used in the knives from the various companies. They are sharpened and polished, ready to mount. Adding your own handle is a fairly simple project, and a good introduction to knife making. The result is uniquely your own, and something you can use with pride. Making a sheath is not that difficult either. The handcrafted look will enhance your historical outfit, or your regular outdoor gear.

I personally prefer carbon steel over stainless steel. In equal quality blades, I feel it is easier to sharpen and holds a better edge. (There is some difference of opinion on this.) There is no denying however, that the Scandinavian stainless steel works very well. They do a lot of salt water fishing and are rather fussy about their knives, so they've learned to make a stainless knife that works. In speaking with the folks at the various factories over there, they seemed to find my interest in carbon steel rather strange. Most of their upscale knives are done in their high quality stainless.

The metric measurements given are taken from the catalogs and are nominal. The English measurements are taken from sample pieces, and may vary somewhat depending on polish, etc.

Click on the images for a larger view.


Norwegian Blades from Helle

These are the excellent laminated steel blades from Helle. They have an outer layer of tough steel for durability, and a hard inner core (HRC 58-59) for superior edges. Except for the #1-C carbon, Helle blades have the Helle logo etched on the blade.

The thickness may vary due to polishing.

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I've since added the following blades.

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#HB-90; laminated stainless steel with satin polish, as used on the Brakar and Taiga. The blade is a bit over 5" long, just over an inch wide and .121" thick. The longer blade would be useful in butchering, or for general camp chores. $37
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#HB-180; laminated stainless steel with mirror polish, as used on the Wind, about 3 1/4" with a trailing point for skinning. (1.18" wide, .106" thick), $26.00

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#HB-88; laminated stainless steel with satin polish, as used on the both the Symfoni and the Harmoni. It's about 3 1/2" long with a slight drop point. The width is just under one inch, and it's about .106" thick. $24.00
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#HB-36; laminated stainless steel with satin polish, as used on the Helle GT. The blade is about 4 7/8" long, 1 1/8" wide" and 126" thick. The wide blade would be useful in skinning, butchering, or for general camp chores. $31.00


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#HB-42; non laminated stainless steel with mirror polish, as used on the Jegermester, 5 1/4" (1.13"w, .125"t), $26.00
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#HB-15; Laminated stainless steel with a satin polish, as used on the Odel. It's about 3 1/2" long, 7/8" wide at the base, and .105" thick. $22.00

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#HB-80; 12C27 non-laminated stainless steel with a satin polish, as used on the Folkniven. It's about 3 1/2" long, 15/16" wide at the base, and .105" thick. $15.00

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These are traditional Norwegian Tollekniv blades. The Tollekniv was, and is, the knife used for all things, but especially woodworking. The blades are a bit larger and stouter than is usual, being 4 3/8" (11cm.) long and 7/8" (2.5cm) wide. It comes in laminated stainless or laminated carbon steel. The stainless is .125" thick, and comes with a satin polish. The carbon is .148" thick, and comes with the black of the heat treat left on the sides for a rustic look. It seems to have been made directly from the hot rolled stock, and almost looks forged. The carbon blade is used on the current version of the Viking.
#HB-1-s; the laminated stainless blade is $25.00
#HB-96; the laminated carbon steel blade is $22.00 Out of Stock, and not expected until late Summer or early Fall.


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For fishermen, I've added some Helle fillet blades. Because fillet blades should be thin, these are not laminated. Because they will be used around water, they are stainless.
The #HB-115 is the same blade used in the "Steinbit". It is just over 6", thin (just .087" at the base) and flexible, $18.00 Out of Stock
The #HB-120, as used in the "Hellefisk". It is about 5" and a little stiffer in the Norwegian style (about .090" at the base), $20


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#HB-70 is the blade from the Helle Lapplander leuku. It's a big blade, 8 1/2" long, over 1 1/2" wide and .102" thick. It's done in polished Sandvik 12C27 stainless for $35.00


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#HB-300 is the blade from the Helle Temagami. The sharpened portion is about 4" long, 1 1/16" wide and .121" thick. Including the tang, it's just 9" overall, done in satin polished laminated stainless. This would make a seriously stout wilderness or utility knife. $49.00

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#HB-301; The same blade is now available in laminated carbon steel. $49.00


Norwegian Knife Blades from Brusletto

larger image #22900, The Brusletto Nansen is a full sized, but thin blade well suited for butchering as well as general camp tasks.. It's 3 3/4" long, 9/16" wide, and .095" thick. Done in a satin polished stainless steel (not laminated) the price is $25.50
larger image #25700, The Framtid was a knife produced for the Brusletto Milennium series ((1896 - 1996). The knife had a molded plastic handle, but I particularly liked the blade shape, so I ordered a few. You will probably want to grind the tang to more conventional shape. The sharpended part of the blade is about 3 1/2" long, 1" wide, and .100" thick. It's done a bead blasted 12C27 hardened to the usual 57 - 58 on the Rockwell C scale. $22.50 (one in stock)


Swedish Knife Blades from Karesuando

Karesuando is well into the Sami (Lapplander) portion of Sweden, and these blades resemble the Finnish style more than the usual Swedish style. Both carbon steel and stainless steel blades are hardened to 57 HRC. They do not have any markings. These blades are very nicely ground and have stouter than average tangs for hard usage. The tangs are quite long, at about 4 1/4", but it's easy to shorten them if necessary.

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Stainless steel blades:

Carbon steel blades (may have stains or spotting)

I've added two more stainless Karesuando blades. These are wider and stouter than the others. The tangs are shorter however, at about 2 3/8".

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enlarged JPEG image. #3560; about 3 1/4" long, 15/16" wide, and .130" thick $21

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enlarged JPEG image. #3561; about 3 7/8" long, 15/16" wide, and .130" thick. $22


Swedish Knife Blades from Mora of Sweden

High carbon laminated steel blades; These are the famous laminated Mora blades. There are three layers, the centers are hardened to 60 - 61 on the Rockwell scale, and the sides are soft. They will hold an edge like a straight razor, but are not brittle. In fact they bend fairly easily and should not be chosen for uses where this will be a problem. The blades vary a bit due to the polishing process, but are about .106" thick. The measurements given are taken from a sample blade and may vary a little. Mora of Sweden was formed from the former Frosts and Eriksson companies. Most blades are marked with the new Mora logo, but some have the old Frosts stamping.

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High carbon non-laminated blades; non laminated blades do not have soft sides, so they can be made thinner and still retain stiffness. Thinner blades slice better. These all have the classic Mora shape with a slight clip, and are hardened to 58 - 59 on the Rockwell scale. The spine of the blades is left rough from the stamping process. You may want to smooth it for appearance, or square up the corners for performance on a fire rod.


Stainless steel (12C27) blades hardened to ~58 on the Rockwell scale.

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#KB-LL-95; For those who prefer the strength of a full width tang, here's a stout one with a Scandinavian grind. The sharpened portion of the blade about 3 1/4" long and 7/8" wide. The length overall is about 8", and it's about 1/8" thick. At least one of these has gone to an airman who simply wrapped the handle with para-cord for a flat, but very stout knife. $50 Out of Stock. (Ouch! The suggested retail is actually $69.99.)

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#KB-2000; I've gotten requests for the Mora 2000 survival knife blade, so here it is. The stainless blade is about 4 5/8" long, just under an inch wide, and .098" thick.
$19

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#KB-1-S; this is basic #1 size in stainless. The blade is about 3 7/8" long, 7/16" (.7") wide and .082" thick. The tang is about 3 1/8" long. These would make up into nice personal knives, or even steak knives. $11.



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#KB-4171; and finally, here's a dedicated kitchen knife. The 7" blade is done the style of a classic chief knife. It's about .078" thick at the base, and 1 5/8" wide. The grind is flat almost to the edge. Done in the Swedish stainless steel, the price is $29.


Finnish Blades from Roslli

High Carbon Roselli Blades

The high carbon Roselli blades are forged from Krupp W75 with a carbon content of .7 - .8%, and hardened to HRC 59 - 62. They are unique among the blades I carry in that they are forged rather than ground to shape. The blades are forged to shape in dies, then finished by hand. The upper sides of the blades still have the forge scale, and the bevels are ground cleanly to the edge with little or no secondary bevel. They are very sharp and ready to work. There are no blade markings.


larger image #R770B; The Roselli Garlic Knife blade is a tiny blade suited to scrimshaw, chip carving, engraved decoration on wooden spoon handles, and other fine work. It's just under an inch long, and .085" thick. The tang is about 1 1/8" long. $24
larger image #R130B; The Roselli Grandmother is a detail carving or paring knife. It's about 2 3/16" long, 3/4" wide, and .130" thick. $39
larger image #R110B; The Roselli Carpenter blade makes a great puukko for everyday carry. The blade is about 3 1/4" long, 3/4" wide, and .141" thick. The tang is about 2 3/8" long. $45
larger image #R160B; The Roselli Opening Knife blade is the European version of the gut hook. Because it cuts from the flesh side of the hide, it doesn't get clogged with fur. It's also handy for boning the legs, etc. The blade is about 3 1/2" long, 3/4" wide, and .117" thick. The tang is about 2 3/8" long. $45
larger image #R100B; The Roselli Hunter is a hunting and skinning blade. The blade is just under 4" long, 1 1/4" wide, and .137" thick. The tang is about 2 3/4" long. $49
larger image #R120B; The Roselli Grandfather is a short, wide, skinning blade or work knife. It's about 2 7/8" long, 1 1/4" wide, and .134" thick. $46
larger image #R151B; The Roselli 5" Leuku is a stout wilderness blade. It's about 5 1/2" long, 1 5/16" wide, and .200" thick. It's not too unwealdy for general chores and heavy enought for light chopping. It has a steel rod welded to the tang for those who like full length tangs. If you prefer the usual Roselli short tang just cut it off. $89
larger image #R150B; The Roselli Leuku is a no nonsense chopping tool. It's about 7 3/4" long, 1 3/8" wide, and .200" thick. This one has a steel rod welded to the tang for those who like full length tangs. If you prefer the usual Roselli short tang just cut it off. $94

UHC (Ultra High Carbon) Roselli Blades

Ultra High Carbon Roselli blades have a carbon content of 1.5 - 2.0%. They are hardened to HRC 64 - 66. As good as the high carbon blades are, these are said to hold an edge about twice as long. It is not practical to sharpen them on a stone, and they require a diamond plate or ceramic.


larger image #R231B; The Roselli Bear Claw in UHC would make a serious wood carving or detail knife. The blade is about 2 3/8" long, 3/4" wide, and .125" thick. The tang is about 2 1/4" long. $55
larger image #R210B; The Roselli Carpenter blade in UHC would be an excellent knife for Scandiavian carving, where longer blades are used. The blade is about 3 1/4" long, 3/4" wide, and .120" thick. The tang is about 2 3/8" long. $75
larger image #R200B; The Roselli Hunter in UHC is a hunting and skinning blade for those who want the ultimate in edge holding. The blade is just ovrer 4" long, 1 1/4" wide, and .122" thick. The tang is about 2 3/4" long. $85
larger image #R200LB; The Roselli Special Length Hunter in UHC is the version favored in Russia when hunting big game such as moose. The blade is just ovrer 5 5/8" long, 1 1/4" wide, and about .121" thick. The tang is about 2 3/4" long. $99
larger image #R220B; The Roselli UHC Grandfather is a blade for those folks who plan in doing a LOT of skinning. It's about 2 7/8" long, 1 3/16" wide and .121" thick. $82
larger image #R755B; The Roselli UHC Cook's knife blade is of course intended to be used in the kitchen. The blade is about 8 1/8" long, or 14 1/8" long including the tang. At the base it's 2 3/8" wide and only .061" thick. This is a slicer, not a chopper. $129

Fittings

I've added just a few basic fittings. For the most part I think you are better off making your own from scratch, or simply not using them, as on many of the Helle knives. If used at all, they should fit exactly. There are so many styles of blades and handles that it would be difficult to carry pre-made guards for every combination. It's best to start with a guard having the slot just a bit small for the blade, then file it to a precise fit. Another option is poured pewter (see below).

Let me say this again, in another way; Matching the guards is quite easy. You want a guard plate with a slot that is bit too small for the blade so you can file it to an exact fit. You can file the slot larger, but you can't file it smaller.
Look at the thickness of the blade, and get a guard with a slot a bit narrower. The length isn't as critical, as long the slot isn't longer than the width of the blade.
The best answer is to just make the guard yourself. Then it will fit in all dimensions. There's video on how to do this linked from the bottom of the knife assembly page.

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larger image Brass guard plates from Karesuando; these are brass stampings, and may require some flattening and polishing. They are about .122" thick. If you decide to use one these, remember to file the guard to fit the tang, not the tang to fit the guard! Due to polishing, some blades have tangs that are a bit wider down the length than at the point where the guard will sit. Here you will have file the tang slightly in order to slide the guard into place. If this is required be sure to draw the file down the length of the tang, not across it. Filing across the tang may weaken it. File the sides of the tang as little as possible.
#3545; an oval plate 1.16" high and .795 wide. The slot is for the 2.5mm thick blade (.600" high and .095" wide). $4.00
#3546; an oval plate 1.16" high and .795 wide. The slot is for the 3.2mm thick blade (.59" high and .118" wide). $4.00
#3575-L; a plate with some left for a finger guard (.709" wide 1.37" high. The slot is .666" high and .121" wide). $5.00 Out of Stock
#3575-S; as above with a smaller slot about .098" wide and .550" high. $5.00 Out of Stock

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larger image Brass fittings from Frosts, for those who prefer the more traditional look of brass fittings, here are some from Frosts. They are the same as used on Frosts knives #277 and #311, and would go well with these blades sold above.
#9262; blade end ferrule from the #277, about .684" tall at the base, .508" wide and .633" deep. The slot is .475" long and .107" wide. $4.
#9263; pommel end ferrule from the #277, about .682" tall, .508" wide and .633" deep. The hole is .193" wide. $4.
#9264; blade end ferrule from the #311, about .860" tall, .424" wide and .503" deep. The slot is .702" long and .129" wide. $4. Out of Stock
#9265; pommel end ferrule from the #311, about .860" tall, .424" wide and .538" deep. The hole is .228" wide. $4.
#9270; pommel nut from the #277, about .307" tall, .314" in diameter. The tapered hole is .155" at the base, and .161" at the top. $2.50

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larger image #99FRAM; Stainless steel guard plate from Helle, as used with the #99 blade above on the Helle Harding. It's about 1.20" tall, .65" wide and .11" thick. The slot is .666" long and .12" wide. $5.00

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larger image End nuts from Helle;
#h1; (left) a flush fit pommel nut as used on the Fjelkniv, OD's are .393" and .285", height is .280", ID is .148". $2.50
#h2; (right) as used on the Nying to provide for a keeper strap. OD's are .276" and .373", height .401", ID is .141". $2.50 Out of Stock.

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larger image Leather pieces for making sheaths; they are cowhide, about 9 1/2" long and 4 3/4" wide. The tanning is done with Oak bark, a traditional, all vegetable process. When wet, the leather becomes soft and pliable. This makes it easy to work and mold to shape. It will dry stiff and hard. After it dries to shape, you should seal it to keep out moisture. A was sealing process is described on the sheath making page . Or you can use regular waterproofing if you want it to be less stiff. .
I currently have two weights:
#OAK4-5; "4-5oz", which is about .07" to .08" thick, 5" wide and 9" long, $8.50 Out of Stock
#OAK5-6; "5-6oz", which is about .08" to .09" thick, 5" wide and 9" long. $9.50 Out of Stock.

If you are going to use a lot of leather, you can get it more cheaply at M. Steffan's Sons, Inc. (tel. 716 852-6771) This is probably the oldest leather goods store in the nation, founded in 1851. It's still under the same name and family. Now operated by the fifth generation, it's a great source for leather and leather working supplies. This is where I get the leather I sell for knife sheaths. If you are going to make more than a few sheaths, you would be better off getting large pieces from Linda. Then you can fit the patterns to the leather and reduce waste. A piece of leather that will make four of the rectangular pieces shown above will usually make five or six sheaths.

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larger image Plastic inserts for sheaths; Iíve had a number of requests for the plastic inserts that many of the Scandinavian factories use in their sheaths. If I use an insert myself, I prefer to carve it out of wood. That way I get just what I want, and it seems more in keeping with the traditional nature of the Scandinavian design. However for those folks who prefer a ready made insert, Iíve added the following styles. They are nicely made in two parts, with one half taking the full thickness of the blade so the edge of the knife is not on the seam. The mouth is slightly funneled for easy entry, and the outside of the insert is nicely rounded. There are four styles:
#3544; a straight insert for blades up to 3/4" wide (19 mm) and 4 1/16" (107 mm) long, $4 Out of Stock
#3555; a straight insert for blades up to 1 1/8" wide (31 mm) and 5 3/4" (150 mm) long, $4
#3556; a curved insert for blades up to 3/4" (22 mm) wide and 4 3/8" (110 mm) long, $4 Out of Stock
#3557; a curved insert for blades up to 5/8" (18.5 mm) wide and 3 5/8" (95 mm) long, $4

If the size of the curved insert is a better fit for your blade, and you prefer a straight insert, you can remove the curved portion.



Ordering

Shipping and handling is $6 per order (not per item) anywhere in the US. Standard shipping is by Priority Mail, so please give me your mailing address, not your UPS address. The $6 doesn't actually cover the cost in many cases, but it's easy to calculate, and is my way of saying "thank you".

Orders in New York State require sales tax. If you don't know the sales tax in your county, I can calculate it for you, but you should expect it to be added. This applies only to orders shipped to addresses within New York State.

I'm sorry, U.S. orders only please.

Most folks use a credit card and the encrypted secure order form. If you prefer, you can FAX your order to 716-731-3715. I'll need the type of card (Discover, Visa, or Master Charge), card number and expiration date. Of course I'll also need to know what you are buying, and where to send it. Please include your e-mail address.

If you don't have a FAX, you can call 716-731-3715. If your timing is good, you can just speak to me and give me the order. If I'm not in the office it will default to the FAX machine. No collect calls.

If instant gratification is unavailable, you can always send a Postal Money Order or check to:

Ragweed Forge
PO Box 326
Sanborn, NY 14132

The Postal Snail may be slow, but he's faithful and discreet. Checks may be held for clearance, so if you're in a hurry, use a money order.

Everything on the page should be on hand and ready to ship. However some items may be short supply, so if you are ordering by mail, you might want to e-mail first so that I can hold your item (ragnar@ragweedforge.com).


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