Ragnar's Historical Knife Catalog

Traditional Knives

Here are some other knives I've decided to carry. I think they are well suited to reenactors, history fans, or others interested in traditional and functional knives.

Index

Condor brand knives

CONDOR TOOL & KNIFE traces its history back to 1787, the year GERB WEYESBERG COMPANY was founded in Solingen, Germany. In 1964, the company formed IMACASA with a new plant in Santa Ana, El Salvador, and filled it with state of the art German equipment and expertise. If you are interested you can read more of the history here.

The knives are stout working patterns with little or no polish. They come with full tang blades of German 1075 carbon steel, hardened and annealed to a hardness of 56-58 on the Rockwell Scale.. The handle scales are hardwood, and are rounded and beveled for all-day working comfort.


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The Condor Sapiens is a neatly made, all around personal knife. The blade is 3 7/8" long, just under 3/4" wide, and a stout .114" thick. The nicely rounded handle is about 4 1/4" long. It has a bit of a notch to keep your fingers off the blade. It fits my small-to-average sized hand quite well. I like this one. It feels like a very heavily built Mora Classic.It even comes with a Scandinavian grind. The stout leather sheath will easily take belts up to 2" wide. The knife alone weighs about 4 1/4 ounces. With the sheath it weighs about 6 ounces. $42.50


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The Condor 4" Basic Bushcraft is a stout bushcraft tool. .The sharpened part of the blade is about 3 1/2" long, and the bade is about .119" thick. The blade is 1075 carbon steel, hardened to 56 - 58 on the Rockwell scale. The point has a good bit if belly for skinning chores. Except for the bevel it's coated in black powder epoxy to help prevent rust. The handle is about 4 1/2" long, and feels good in my small to average sized hand. The knife weighs about 5 1/2 ounces and feels solid. Weight with the sheath is about 9 ounces. While not flashy, it's a nice piece of kit for $33.75


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The Condor 5" Basic Bushcraft is a larger version suited to those with larger hands. Besides a longer blade, it has a slightly larger handle. Otherwise it's very similar.$37.50


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The Condor Kephart is based on a knife designed by the outdoor writer Horace Kephart. His book "Camping and Woodcraft" is a classic. I have a copy that I bought many years ago, and highly recommend it. The knife has a blade about 4 1/2" long, 1" wide, and .115" thick at the base. The thickness of the blade tapers along the length, giving the knife an excellent balance. The blade is flat ground from the spine, with a secondary bevel at the edge. This should be a very efficient knife for butchering, as well as general camp tasks. The handle is a bit less than 4 1/2" long, and sized for average hands. It weighs about 4 1/4 ounces, or about 6 ounces in the sheath. I often prefer Scandinavian grinds for bushcraft knives, but this one feels so good that I'm tempted to take one out of inventory and give it a try. $37.50.

If you have an interest in old time country living, you will probably like Mr. Kephart's book "Out Southern Highlanders". It's available free from Project Gutenberg.


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The Condor Lifeland Hunter is similar in size, but quite different in concept. It has a modified clip point blade reminiscent of the hunting and camping knives popular in the late 1800 and early 1900’s. The blade is about 4 ½” long, with about 3 Ύ” of that sharpened. It’s about 1” wide and .142” thick. The handle is about 4 !/4” long, and sized for smaller hands. The notch at the base of the blade allows you to choke up on it for better control. It weighs about 4 Ύ ounces, or 6 ½ ounces in the sheath. Unlike the other Condor knives I carry, this one is done in English 420 HC Stainless steel hardened and annealed to 56-58 HRC for easy care. $44


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The Condor Bushlore has a carbon steel blade about 4 1/2" long, 1 3/16" wide and .114" thick. It has the Scandinavian style grind. The handle is just under 5" long, and is sized for average or slightly larger hands. There is a brass lined lanyard hole. The knife feels very solid, and would be a good "go to" knife for hard work. The knife weighs about 6 ounces, or just under 8 ounces with the sheath. $42.50


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The Condor Mini Bushlore has a blade only 2 3/4" long, 1" wide and .112" thick. Tha handle is about 3 1/2" long. I can just get all four fingers on the handle, but for those with large hands it's going to be a three fingered grip. Despite the small size, it has the full tang construction of it's bigger brother. It's very stout. The knife and sheath weigh about 4 3/4 ounces.$27


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The Condor Nessmuk is patterned after the knife designed by the well known outdoorsman George Washington Sears in the late 1800's. His book "Woodcraft and Camping" is excellent. You can download a free copy from Project Gutenberg.

The knife itself has a blade about 3 3/4" long, 1 1/2" wide, and .113" thick. The distinctive hump facilitates opening big game without puncturing the internal organs. Again the handle is about 4 1/2" long, and is sized for average hands. The leather sheath is well made, and holds the knife securely.$37.50


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The Condor Hudson Bay is a big camp-knife chopper. The blade is about 8 1/2" long, 2" wide and .190" (3/16") thick. The 4 3/4" handle is sized for average or slightly larger hands. The knife alone weighs about 15 1/2 ounces. Again, it comes with a stout leather sheath. This would fill about the same role as the Scandinavian leuku at a fraction of the cost, and with a handle better sized for those with average or smaller hands. $45


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The Condor Golok Machette is still larger, with a full tang blade a bit over 14” long, 1 7/8” wide, and a full .221” thick. The handle is about 6” long, and is definitely sized for larger hands. The weight of the machete is 1.3 pounds, and it’s supplied with leather sheath. $60.


Trade Knives

During the Colonial Period, knife blades were often traded rather than finished knives. This saved space in shipping, and customers were often unwilling to pay for something they could make themselves (the handle portion). These are hand-made replicas of the finished knives. They are made of properly tempered spring steel and take a good edge. Like the originals, they are quite thin (about .062" or just under 1/16") so they are light to carry and make good slicers. The sides are lightly polished after heat treat and the residual scale resembles damascus. The knives are hand crafted here in the U.S. by Dean Oliver so each one is a bit different. They come with nicely figured Maple handles and brass pins. No sheath is supplied, but it's not that hard to make your own. If you prefer, I now have some quality sheaths made by Dean's wife Midge, shown below.

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French drop point trade knives are a done in a classic all-purpose pattern. They come in several sizes.
#TR-FS; the small drop point is just right for a neck knife or patch cutter. The blade is about 2 3/4", and the length is about 4 3/4". $28
#TR-FM; the medium drop point is a more generally useful size, with a blade length of about 3 1/2", and a length overall of about 6 1/2". $34.
#TR-FL; the large drop point has about 5" of blade and is about 9" overall. $38
#TR-FB; this one has the very early ball end on the handle. Besides being very authentic, I think it improves control. $38

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#TR-M; the Metis pattern reminds me of a Green River Dadley style. It would make a good all around utility and butcher knife. The blade is just over 5", and the knife is about 9" overall. $38
#TR-ENG: the English trade knife is modeled after the straight-forward English trade goods of the period. The handle is of hexagon form rather then the rounded form of the French drop points. The 5 1/4" blade is straight backed, and the knife is about 9 1/4" overall. $38.
#TR-SW; The Southwestern bird-beak style is a trailing point skinner. The handle shape locks into your hand, even when it is wet or slippery. The blade length is just over 5". $38
#TR-LC; the Lewis & Clark is copied after an example associated with the famous expedition. Interestingly, it is very similar to a very early "I Wilson" knife in my collection. The blade is fairly narrow and straight, with a clip to form a acute point. It's about about 5" long. While the example in the group picture has a square handle, my current stock has rounded handles like the one shown with the "I Wilson" knife. $38
#TR-V; the Voyager is a slightly larger version of the roach belly utility knives traded by the Hudson's Bay Company. The blade has a bit of a curve to work against a block or for occasional skinning. It's a good all-around shape that goes back to the medieval period. The blade is about 4 3/4" long, and the knife is about 8 1/2" overall. $38
#TR-RB; the Roach Belly is the smaller version of this classic early shape. It has a rounded handle that really feels good in my small to average sized hand. The blade is a bit under 4", as is the handle. I think this is my favorite of the lot. $34
#TR-BT; the Boot Knife; (Discontinued)
#TR-FK: the Trade Fork is an eating fork made in the same style as the others. In Newman's "Colector's Illustrated Encyclopedia of the American Revolution" (p. 109) stick tang eating forks are shown as two tined, full tang forks like the Trade Forks are three tined. These are nicely done with hexagonal handles and could be matched with several of the knifes above. (It was common for the knife and fork to be similar in style, but not the spoon.) $26.

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Hudson's Bay Roach

#TR-HBR; For those who prefer a slightly thicker blade I've added the Hudson's Bay Roach. The blade is about 5 1/2" long, 1 1/4" wide, and .093" (about 3/32") thick. As the name implies, it has a bit of belly for skinning and butchering. $49
TR-HBRS: The matching sheath is $19.


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Trade Knife Sheaths

I've finally found some good sheaths for the trade knives. The ones I carried in the past were made of leather that was too thin, and too soft. These are stout, stiff, and sewn with a welt. They are made by Dean's wife, Midge. There are several sizes.

Small; #TR-SS, fits the Small French and comes with a neck thong. $10
Medium Neck; #TR-MNS, fits the Medium French, and Roach. It also hangs from a neck thong. $14
Medium Belt; #TR-MBS, Similar to the Medium Neck, but comes with a belt loop. $14
The Medium is also a fairly good fit for the Mora #2/0, as well as the #106..
Large; #TR-LS, fits the larger knives except the Hudson's Bay Roach. It has a belt loop. $18
These are a decent fit for the Mora Companion knives.
Hudson's Bay Roach Sheath (a bit larger then the regular "large"); #TR-HBS, $20.
Lewis and Clark Sheath; #TR-LCS, a long and narrow sheath for the Lewis & Clark trade knife or Boot knife, it also fits the Roach, taking most of the knife for a period-correct fit. #TR-LCS, $20 Out of Stock.
These are a good fit for the Mora Classic #1.



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TR-KFS; is a sheath for the fork and a medium sized knife such as the Roach.. It's a convenient way to carry your eating utensils. The price of the sheath is $25.
(The knfe and fork are sold separately.)


Old Hickory Knives

"Old Hickory" is a brand produced by the Ontario Knife Company of Western New York. The company was founded in 1889, but the styles go back much further. The blades are carbon steel (1095) and are heat treated for a combination of edge retention and ease of sharpening. They come with hardwood handles pinned with brass rivets. They are similar to the knives carried by early hunters before specialised "hunting knives" were introduced in the late 1800's. Like the Swedish Moras, their utility is all out of proportion to the trivial cost. No sheath is provided.

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#OH-7533; The 3 1/4" Paring Knife is a basic paring or food prep knife. The blade is only .052" thick and 11/16" wide. The tang extends about the length of the handle. $8

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#OH-7504; The 4" Paring Knife is a just a bit longer. Again the blade is only .052" thick and 3/4" wide. The tang extends about the length of the handle. It would also do nicely as a patch knife. I think this one is shaped more nicely. $9

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#OH-5075; The Cabbage Knife is really a scaled down butcher knife. The blade is just over 6" long, only .080" thick and flat ground from the spine of the blade. It would be an excellent slicer, and just the thing for butchering in the field. Even with the full tang, it weighs only 3 1/4 ounces, so it wouldn't be burdensome to carry along. $10

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#OH-726; The Old Hickory Boning Knife also has a 6" blade, but its stiff and narrow. The blade is .079" thick and saber ground for strength. It has a full tang, and would make a good general purpose knife for those who like 6" blades. $12.

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#OH-77; The Old Hickory 7" Butcher Knife would have been right at home in the sash of a colonial period Native American, or a Rocky Mountain fur trapper a hundred years later. The blades are about 7" long and only .081" thick. It's a serious slicer. $12.50

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#OH-758; The Old Hickory 8" Slicing Knife is lighter and quicker. The blade is about .055" thick. The thinner blade and long clip shape move the balance back toward the base of the blade, and keeps the weight under 4 ounces. This is a knife for all-day butchering with minimal fatigue. $12.00

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#OH-7112; The Old Hickory 12" Butcher Knife is a big knife with some weight to the blade. It would be suitable not only for butchering, but as a camp knife or even light machete. In other words, it fills the same role as the Scandinavian Leuku at a fraction of the cost. The blade is about 12" long, 1 5/6" wide at the base, and .098" thick. It has a full tang. The oversized handle is about 5 1/2" long. The knife weighs a bit over 12 1/2 ounces. There is no sheath. The price is only (discontinued, you might look at the 10" and 14" models listed below.
#OH-7111; (not shown) It's also available with a 10" blade, .098" thisk, for $17.
#OH-7113; (not shown) and with a 14" blade for $23.


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#OH-71; The Old HIckory Skinning Knife is a heavy duty skinner for larger animals from deer to cattle (or even buffalo). The blade is about 6" long, and .095" thick. It has a full tang. $15.


Medieval Style Knife and Fork

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The Medieval style knife and fork are hand forged in Pakistan, where skilled labor is cheap. The knife is very similar to one I used to make when I had time to get to the forge. It's more typical of Northern Europe, and survived in rural areas of Finland almost into modern times. It has a blade a bit over 5", and is just over 10" overall. The fork is just over 9" long, and has the early straight tines. Again, they are hand forged, and vary somewhat.
Medieval Knife, $12
Medieval Fork, $12
Set, one of each, $22


Medieval Eating Knife

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Long and slender eating knives were more typical of middle and upper class folks, especially in the later Medieval Period. They were sometimes used in pairs. These are also made in Pakistan, and have narrow blades about 5 1/2" long. The handles are horn (?) with copper, brass and white metal inlays. The blades are about as sharp as modern table knives, but could easily be sharpened further. $10


Ordering

Shipping and handling is $6 per order (not per item) anywhere in the US. Standard shipping is by Priority Mail, so please give me your mailing address, not your UPS address. The $6 doesn't actually cover the cost in many cases, but it's easy to calculate, and is my way of saying "thank you".

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Most folks use a credit card and the encrypted secure order form. If you prefer, you can FAX your order to 716-731-3715. I'll need the type of card (Discover, Visa, or Master Charge), card number and expiration date. Of course I'll also need to know what you are buying, and where to send it. Please include your e-mail address.

If you don't have a FAX, you can call 716-731-3715. If your timing is good, you can just speak to me and give me the order. If I'm not in the office it will default to the FAX machine. No collect calls.

If instant gratification is unavailable, you can always send a Postal Money Order or check to:

Ragweed Forge
PO Box 326
Sanborn, NY 14132

The Postal Snail may be slow, but he's faithful and discreet. Checks may be held for clearance, so if you're in a hurry, use a money order.

Everything on the page should be on hand and ready to ship. However some items may be short supply, so if you are ordering by mail, you might want to e-mail first so that I can hold your item (ragnar@ragweedforge.com).


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