Mora of Sweden

The town of Mora in Sweden has been a center of knife making for many centuries. The naturally superior Swedish steel, combined with skilled craftsmanship, resulted in knives that became famous for their ability to hold a superior edge and sharpen easily. The smiths in Mora developed a basic functional style that became a classic, known simply as the “Mora Knife.” Until recently there were two remaining large companines in Mora, KJ Eriksson and Frosts of Mora. They have merged into "Mora of Sweden", but some stock is marked with the previous names.

Mora knives place function before style. But the simplicity of functionality has a beauty of it's own. The quality and prices are great, and they're one of the best knife bargains around. They have the flat Scandinavian grind that goes cleanly to the edge, and come from the factory very sharp. This style of grind is easy to sharpen without jigs or gadgets.

Carbon steel blades are hardened to 59 - 60 on the Rockwell scale, stainless blades to 57 - 58. A specialty of Mora is the laminated carbon blade. This is a three part sandwich, with a core of high carbon steel protected by sides of tough lower carbon steel. The core of the laminated steel blades is hardened to about 61 on the Rockwell scale. Normally, I prefer carbon steel over stainless steel, but I have to admit that the stainless Mora knives take and hold an excellent edge. They are made of Swedish Sandvik 12C27 steel, hardened to 57 - 58 on the Rockwell Scale. For use around water, especially salt water, stainless may be the better choice.

The classic Nordic knives come without a guard (like most kitchen knives). This enables you to make cuts you could not do otherwise, but you do have to be careful not to cut yourself. Once you are accustomed to it, it isn't a problem. I've been using them for over 50 years, and don't ever recall cutting myself because of a lack of a guard. Be careful though, they are really sharp!

One exception to this suggestion is hunting. When cleaning game your hands may be wet and slippery. When cleaning large game you may need to reach into the body cavity. If the point of the knife catches on a rib the knife can slide in your hand with nasty results. I strongly recommend a finger guard for a hunting knife.

Some of the older models come with sheaths have belt slots intended for very thin belts. It seems the wide and thick American style belt is not used in Europe. Many also have a slot for fastening to a button, such as a coverall button. This is very tradtional in Scandinavia, and modern coveralls as well as the folk costumes often have a button for the purpose. It's easy enough to open up the belt loop if you prefer. The sheaths are thermoplastic, which means they get soft when warmed. If you warm the belt hanger, and insert a piece of wood or even a ruler, it will keep the new shape when it cools. See the images.

Are you a dealer? I can wholesale these knives. E-mail ragnar@ragweedforge.com for details.

There is such a variety of Mora knives that it can become confusing to choose. I’ve decided to list some of the newer and more popular models at the top of the page. They may appear again their respective groupings. Woodcarving and whittling knives are listed toward the bottom, as are fishing knives.

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New!

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#510. The #510 is back! This was one of the top selling Mora knives in North America. Apparently it didn’t do as well in Sweden, because it was discontinued in favor of the #511 a few years ago. Now I’m very happy to see it back in production. Like the #511, the carbon steel blade is 3 ¾” long and .078” (2 mm) thick. The two millimeter thickness is thick enough to be useful, and thin enough to slice well. The handle is sized for average or slightly smaller hands. It has a molded in pattern with a pebbled surface for excellent control with a variety of grips. The sheath has the usual button slot, but can be opened up take a narrow belt as indicated above. The knife weighs only 2 ¼ ounces, or 3 ¼ ounces in the sheath. This makes it very viable as a neck knife. The price is $12. This is more than the #511, but I'm told that it can't be assembled on the fully automated line as used for the #511.

The Mora Companion

The Companion line is a revision of the old Clipper line. It’s been a mainstay of hikers, campers, bushcrafters and hunters for decades. The handles are solid plastic with a rubber overlay for improved grip. They are comfortable and secure under hard usage and severe conditions. The sheaths come with a belt clip that snaps easily over a belt belt. It will securely fit belts up to 1 3/4" wide, and can also be fastened over wider belts, but doesn't lock as securely. It can also be worn on a button in the Scandinavian fashion. This makes it easy to attach them to overalls as well as belts. They are excellent all around knives for minimal cost. Don't be fooled by the low price. Like all Mora knives they have excellent steel and blade geometry. They should stand up to a lifetime of hard use.

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#11863: The Companion MG Carbon has a carbon steel blade 3 7/8" long, 13/16" wide and .080" thick. The thinner blade improves slicing and carving charactics, and has proven to be adiquate for any reasonable task. The handle is sized for average hands. The handle trim and sheath are military green. The knife and sheath weigh a bit under 4 ounces. This would make a nice all around knife for those who like the easy sharpening charactics of carbon steel. $12.


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#11827: The Companion MG Stainless has a stainless blade 3 7/8" long, 13/16" wide and .098" thick, The handle is sized for average hands. The handle trim and sheath are military green. It's supplied with a good quality plastic sheath with a belt hook that can be snapped over the belt. The knife and sheath weigh just over 4 ounces. This would make a nice all around knife for canoeing, or use around salt water. $13.


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#11824: The Companion F; for those who want something that's easy to find in the snow or leaves, the Companion also comes with a florescent orange sheath and handle trim. Except for the color, it's the same as as the Companion MG Stainless. $13.


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#12095;; other colors are available as well. All come with stainless blades, .098" thick.
#12095-BLACK: $13
#12095-LIME: $13
#12095-BLUE: $13
#12095-MAGENTA: $13


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#11746: The Companion HeavyDuty Military Green is a new model for heavier utility or Bushcraft work. The carbon steel blade is about 4 inches long, 3/4" wide, and .126" thick. That's about 1/8", The sheath has a belt hook that can be snapped over the belt. It will securely fit belts up to 1 3/4" wide, and can also be fastened over wider belts, but doesn't lock as securely. The handle is a bit longer than the regular Companion model (4 3/4" vs 4 1/2"). . $19

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#11867: The Companion HeavyDuty F is a similar model with a florescent orange sheath and handle trim. You should be able to see this when you lay it down! Again, the carbon steel blade is about 4 inches long, 3/4" wide, and .126" thick. That's about 1/8", $19

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#10315: The Robust is a similar model with more neutral coloring. The sheath and trim are dark gray, and the handle overlay is light gray. It comes with the new "dual sheath", which has a post on the front to allow attachment of another knife or other tool. Again, the carbon steel blade is about 4 inches long, 3/4" wide, and .126" thick. $15

If you are interested, here's a YouTube review by a British bushcrafter.


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#12049: The Bushcraft Orange has a Sandvik stainless steel blade about 4 1/4 inches long, 3/4" wide, and .126" thick. The spine of the blade is ground square with sharp corners for use with a firesteel or shaving tinder. The handle and sheath are a very bright hot orange. You shouldn't loose this one in the snow or leaves. The sheath comes with the Bushcraft style belt loop that swivels for comfort when sitting, etc. The knife alone weighs about 4 1/4 ounces, or a bit under 6 ounces with the sheath, This is heavy for a Mora knife, but because the balance is just under your index finger it feels very quick. $35

#12050; It's also available packed with both a belt loop and belt clip. (You get one sheath and two attachments).$39 Out of Stock

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#12051: The Bushcraft Survival Orange comes with .126" thick stainless blade, fire steel and diamond sharpening plate on the sheath. The handle and trim on the sheath are a bright orange. The sheath comes with packed with two belt clips, the new style that encircles the belt, and the old style that clips over it. (You get one sheath and two clips.) $75.


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#12043: The Bushcraft Black has a carbon steel blade about 4 1/4 inches long, 7/8" wide, and .126" thick. The blade has a black coating to help prevent rust and unwanted reflections. The spine of the blade is ground square with sharp corners for use with a firesteel or shaving tinder. The handle and sheath are a matching black. The sheath comes with the Bushcraft style belt loop that swivels for comfort when sitting, etc. The knife alone weighs about 4 1/4 ounces, or a bit under 6 ounces with the sheath, This is heavy for a Mora knife, but because the balance is just under your index finger it feels very quick. $39

#10791; It's also available packed with both a belt loop and belt clip. (You get one sheath and two attachments). $43

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#11742: The Bushcraft Survival Black adds an all weather fire starter to the sheath, as well as a diamond sharpening plate. The sheath comes with packed with two belt clips, the new style that encircles the belt, and the old style that clips over it. (You get one sheath and two clips.) $75.


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#11859; The Mora Fire Steel is available separately, either as a refill for the Survival package, or for stand alone use. The exposed part of the fire rod is about 2 1/2" long and 5/16" n diameter. The handle has a hole for a lanyard. It weighs a bit over an ounce. A striker is not provided, but you can use the back of the Survival Knife, or any sharp edge. A broken piece of glass or sharp rock will work nicely. $15

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#12418: The Bushcraft Black SRT has a stainless steel blade as well as partial serrations. This would be an interssting knfe for boaters, expecally on salt water. The blade is about 4 1/4 inches long, 7/8" wide, and .128" thick. The blade has a black coating to prevent reflections. The spine of the blade is ground square with sharp corners for use with a firesteel or shaving tinder. The handle and sheath are a matching black. The sheath comes with the Bushcraft style belt loop that swivels for comfort when sitting, etc. The knife alone weighs about 4 1/4 ounces, or a bit under 6 ounces with the sheath, $49


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#12281: The Bushcraft Black Serrated Tactical adds a MOLLE compatable sheath as well as partial serrations. Again, the blade is stainless steel about 4 1/4 inches long, 7/8" wide, and .126" thick. The blade has a black coating to help prevent unwanted reflections. The spine of the blade is ground square with sharp corners for use with a firesteel or shaving tinder. The handle and sheath are a matching black. $55.

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#11882: The Bushcraft Pathfinder is a larger version with a carbon steel blade about 6 3/4" long, 1 1/8" wide, and .125" thick. The extra length, and slight flare toward the tip, move the balance forward for improved chopping. The blade is coated to help prevent corrosion, and reduce unwanted reflections. The spine of the blade is squared off sharply for use with firesteels. The sheath is nylon with a plastic insert, and is MOLLE compatable. $99.


Swedish FireKnife

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The Fire Knife is a joint venture of Mora of Sweden and Light-My-Fire, a Swedish company known for excellent fire steels. At first glance it looks like a variation on the Companion knives, but the pommel holds a fire steel. The spine of the blade is squared off to serve as a scraper for the fire rod. Like all Light My Fire products, the FireSteel works very well indeed. The stainless blade is about 3 3/4" long, 11/16" wide and .078" thick. The pommel locks securely onto the knife, and comes with a lanyard. The handle size is essentially the same as the Companion line, sized for average hands. The knife and sheath only weigh a bit under 4 ounces, so this would be an excellent choice for hikers. It comes in five colors, ranging from an unobtrusive black, to an easy to find international orange. The five colors are black, cyan blue, lime green, red and international orange.

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Please specify color. $29

The FireKnife normally comes without packaging (save the trees), but for the holidays I've gotten some in a display gift box. If you would like it sent in the box for gift giving, please add $1.00. Again, please sepcify the color.

Here's a video demonstration. Please use your back button to return.


I also have the firesteels separately.

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#FSAR-BLACK; Swedish FireSteel by Light My Fire; Army Model; While certainly not traditional, the modern fire stick is eminently practical. The Army model has a rod about 3/8" in diameter and 2 1/2" long. It comes packed on a lanyard with a striker. The assembly weights a bit over 1 1/2 ounces. Some folks prefer to keep a square corner in the back of their knife blade to serve as the scraper. It is said to last for about 12,000 uses. . Made in Sweden, $16


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#FSAR2-BLACK; Swedish FireSteel by Light My Fire; Army Model with Whistle is suppled with striker that has a comfortable plastic handle incorperating a whistle. The assembly weights about 1 3/4 ounces. It is said to last for about 12,000 uses. Made in Sweden, $17


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#FSAR2-ORANGE; Swedish FireSteel by Light My Fire; Army Model with Whistle is also available in orange so you can see it when you lay it down. $17.


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#SFAR2-COCO; Swedish FireSteel by Light My Fire; Army Model with Whistle and Coco handles. For the environmentally aware, here's a version with handles from compressed coconut shell material. $17


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#FSSC; Swedish FireSteel by Light My Fire; Scout Model; The Scout Model is a bit lighter to carry, and has a red handle to help prevent loss. They are about 3" over all and come on a cord with a striking steel. The assembly weighs a bit over one ounce. The exposed rod is about 1/4" in diameter and 1 3/4" long. It is said to last for about 3000 uses. . Made in Sweden, $12.


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#FSSC2; Swedish FireSteel by Light My Fire; Scout Model with Whistle; Again, this is the Scout model supplied with a whistle in the striker. $13.


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Refills are available for the Army and Scout FireSteels. The Scout size will also fit the FireKnives. They can also be used to make your own FireSteel with a handle of your choice. An antler tine makes a nice rustic handle. Just drill a hole and glue it in place.
#S-FSAR-ST; for the Army FireSteel, a little over 2 1/2" (65 mm) long , and a bit less than 3/8" (9 mm) in diameter. $9
#S-FSSC-ST; for the Scout FireSteel, and FireKnives, a little under 2" (50 mm) long, and about 1/4" in diameter. $7


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#FSMN-ORANGE; Swedish FireSteel by Light My Fire Mini Model; for those truely concerned with weight and bulk, the Mini weighs about a half an ounce, complete with lanyard and striker. It's rated at 1,500 uses. Without the striker it's just over a quarter ounce, and is a bit under 3" long. This is about the size of a car key, and it would ride nicely on your key chain. The price is only $8.


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Tinder-on-a-Rope from Light My Fire; is a natural way to start a fire in almost any weather. It's made from fatwood, so there are no chemicals or toxic fumes. It's high in resin content, so it doesn't absorb water, and works well in wet conditions. Powder shaved from the stick will catch a spark from a Light My Fire rod easily. In wet conditions you can add a few slivers of the wood to really get your fire going. The flame from the resin burns hotter than paper or parafin. The block is about 6" long, and weighs about 1 3/4 ounces. $4.00


The Classic Mora Knife

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The Classic #1; In Sweden this was once the basic knife. If you asked to borrow a knife, odds are this is what you would get. Now the other models with plastic handles have become more popular. But I still prefer the classic lines and the feel of the wood handles. Perhaps it's because I had a similar knife as as child. It became my "go to" knife, and I'm still using it. The carbon steel (not laminated) blade is just under 4" (100 mm) long, 11/16" wide and .080" thick. The 4" red painted birch handle is suited for average sized hands. Current stock comes with 3/4 tangs. Weight, with a functional black plastic sheath, is about 2 3/4 ounces. The price is only $14.00
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If you have large hands you might prefer the Classic #2 shown further down on the page. If you really want a finger guard, you might look the "Classic Mora Knives with Finger Guards" also shown further down. Finger guards are a very good idea when cleaning large game, and children are often started out with a knife having a guard.


Mora Bushcraft

The Bushcraft line is a series of knives for outdoor use. It combines and improves upon some of the best features of both the older Frosts and Eriksson brands. The sheath has an improved belt loop made of a flexible plastic that will accept belts up to 2 1/2" wide. The loop can be swiveled for comfort when sitting.

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#11602; The Bushcraft Forest has a 4 1/4" blade of Sandvik stainless steel about 7/8" wide and .098" thick. The profile grind of the blade is the same as is used on the popular "Mora 2000". The handle and sheath are done in a dark military green. The knife and sheath weigh just 5 ounces. $32.50
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#11631; The Bushcraft Signal is similar to the Forest, but the sheath and handle trim are a bright florescent yellow. This makes it easier to see when you set it down. $32.50 Closeout special, $25
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The Classic Mora Knife

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#1. In Sweden this was once the basic knife. If you asked to borrow a knife, odds are this is what you would get. Now the other knives with plastic handles have become more popular, but I still prefer the classic lines of the wood handles. The carbon steel (not laminated) blade is just under 4" (100 mm) long, 11/16" wide and .080" thick. The 4" red painted birch handle is suited for average sized hands. Current stock comes with 3/4 tangs. Weight, with a functional black plastic sheath, is about 2 3/4 ounces.
Price: $14.00.

If you would prefer a stout leather sheath, the L&C Trade Knife sheath is a good fit. It's available separately for $20 Out of Stock.


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Classic Mora Knives
The same general pattern is available in other sizes as well.
They all come with high carbon steel blades
and black plastic sheaths.


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Classic Mora Knives with guards
Some folks feel more secure using a knife with a guard. Guards are strongly indicated for cleaning and butchering large game, expecially when working in the body cavitly. In Sweden it's common to start children with a knife having a guard. When the child shows some skill with the knife the guard may be removed or reduced.
These knives from Eriksson have high carbon steel blades, and come with black plastic sheaths.


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Original Classic Mora Knives
#11011; Mora Original Classic #1. Before the introduction of modern plastics, many Mora knife sheaths were made of a fiber called "Unica". The fiber is actually stiched as if it were leather. The belt tab has the traditional button hole attachment. The 3 3/4" blades are laminated carbon steel with full length tangs, about .102" thick. The handles are unfinished birch. The weight with the sheath is only about 2 3/4 ounces, I think it would make an excellent neck knife. $34



#39 Safe is a smaller knfe with a stainless blade of about 3 3/8" long, and .079" (2mm) thick. It has the same stamped crossguard, and a natural wood handle of about 3 5/8". This one is sized for younger children. The tip of the blade is rounded, but the edge is still very sharp. It's up to you to know if your child is ready for a really sharp knife. It comes with a black leather sheath with a keeper strap. $24.
Besides the standard natural handles, I currently have one each with handles in red and blue. All come with black sheaths.


Craftline Knives from Mora of Sweden

The Craftline series is a new release from the merged Eriksson and Frosts firms. The handles are a solid hard plastic cast directly onto the blades, with a second layer of softer textured rubber for imporved grip and comfort. They fit my average sized hands very well indeed. The sheaths are a semi flexable plastic and hold the knives very securely. They have a clip that fits belts up to 1 3/4" securely, and can be used with wider belts as well. They also have a slot to fit an overall button.


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#10315; The Craftline Robust is a new model for heavy utility or Bushcraft work. The carbon steel blade is about 4 inches long, 3/4" wide, and .126" thick. That's about 1/8", and the thickest blade on a Mora knife to date. The handle is about 4 3/4" long, and proportioned for average size hands. The sheath has the usual belt clip that will securely take belts up to 1 3/4" wide, but can also be fastened over wider belts. It has the new dual sheath post described above. The knife and sheath weigh about 4 3/4 ounces. This one feels like a worker. $15.


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#11999: The Craftline Allround is a general purpose knife. The Sandvik stainless blade is about 3 7/8" long, 13/16" wide and .098" (2.5 mm) thick. It has the usual Mora Scandinavian grind, and is hardened to about 57 on the Rockwell scale. This would be an excellent knife for any outdoor activity, from hiking and canoeing, to dressing deer and small game. The knife and sheath weigh only 4 ounces. $14.


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#11904: The Craftline Ropeknife is a version of the Allround with partial serrations. I'm not a great fan of serrations, but they are popular with sailors and emergency responders. It comes with international orange trim and a black sheath. The knife and sheath weigh only 4 ounces. $17.25.


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#11902: The Craftline Flex Knife has a flat ground stainless blade about 3 1/2" long and only .047" thick at the base. As the name implies, it has a bit of flex, and would be a good small fishing knife. It would also be handy in the kitchen. $17.25.


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#11398: The Craftline Chisel Knife is a tool for carpenters and other craftsmen. It combines the functions of a knife and a chisel. The stainless blade has a straight edge 3" long, and a sharpened square end about 13/16" (.81") wide. The blade is a stout .096" thick, and is beveled on both sides. $17.25 .

#11905; It's also available with a black sheath. $17.25


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#11901: The Craftline Precision Knife has a narrow stainless blade 2 5/8" long, 1/2" wide at the base, and .078" thick. The ergonomic handle shape of the Craftline series helps keep the hand off the blade, making this a good whittling or craft knife for beginners as well as experienced users. $17.25


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#11403: The Craftline Installer has a stubby blade with an edge about 1 3/4" long. It's done in the same stainless as the others, and is about a bit less than 3/4" wide and .078" thick. It's intended for striping insulation from wires, or any other tasks requiring a short blade and good leverage. I'm told it's an excellent pruning knife. $17.25.

#11903; It's also available in a black sheath. $17.25


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#11672: The HighQ Allround Stainless is an all purpose knife with a slightly smaller blade than the Craftline Allround shown above. The blade is 3 3/4" long, 11/16" wide and .079" (2mm) thick. The knife and sheath weigh just over 3 1/2 ounces. . The sheath has a stud on the front that can be used to hold another sheath. $11


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#11675: The HighQ Allround Carbon has a carbon steel blade 3 3/4" long, 11/16" wide and .079" (2mm) thick. This would be a good all arround woods knife for those who prefer carbon steel and a smaller blade. The sheath has a stud on the front that can be used to hold another sheath. $10


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#11969: The HighQ "Safe Knife" is a variation with a blunt point. The tip of the blade is rounded, and not sharp. The stainless blade about 3 1/2" long and .078" thick. This could be useful for rescue situations, or use in inflated craft. Traditionally, blunt-tipped knives are sometimes used a training knives for children, but the edge is really sharp, and it's up to you to know if your child is ready for such a knife. $11.


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#11673: The HighQ Installer has a stubby carbon steel blade 1 5/8" long, 11/16" wide and .076" (2mm) thick. $11.25


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#11674: The HighQ Chisel comes with a carbon steel blade about 3" long, 7/8" wide and .092" thick. Unlike the Craftline chisel knife, this one is beveled only on one side. the other side is flat. $12.50.


The Companion Knives from Mora of Sweden

The Mora Companion series is an update of the older Frosts Clipper series shown further down the page. The handles are almost identical but have a different pattern molded into the overlay. The sheaths come up the handle a bit further, and hold the knife more securely.

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#11863: The Companion MG Carbon has a carbon steel blade 3 7/8" long, 13/16" wide and .080" thick, The handle is sized for average hands. The handle trim and sheath are military green. It's supplied with a good quality plastic sheath with a belt hook that can be snapped over the belt. This would make a nice all around knife for those who like carbon steel. The handle is suited for average sized hands, but works well for somewhat smaller and larger hands as well. $12.


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#11827: The Companion MG Stainless has a stainless blade 3 7/8" long, 13/16" wide and .098" thick, The handle is sized for average hands. The handle trim and sheath are military green. It's supplied with a good quality plastic sheath with a belt hook that can be snapped over the belt. This would make a nice all around knife for canoeing or other wet conditions. $13.


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#11824: The Companion F comes with a florescent orange sheath and trim on the handle. It has a stainless blade 3 7/8" long, 13/16" wide and .098" thick, The handle is sized for average hands. It's supplied with a good quality plastic sheath with a belt hook that can be snapped over the belt. This would make a nice all around knife for canoeing or other wet conditions. It would be easy to see when you lay it down. $13.


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#11829: The Companion FS has a stainless serriated blade 3 7/8" long, 13/16" wide and .098" thick, The handle is sized for average hands. The handle trim and sheath are florescent orange. It's supplied with a good quality plastic sheath with a belt hook that can be snapped over the belt. I'm not a great fan of serriated blades, but they can be useful for cutting marine rope, etc. $17


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#11828: The Companion Rescue has a stainless serriated blade with a blunt tip. The blade is 3 3/4" long, 13/16" wide and .098" thick, Again, the handle trim and sheath are florescent orange. As the name inplies, this one is intended for emergency personel. It wouldn't be a bad idea for use on an inflatable raft either. $17.


Mora Clippers

The Mora Clippers have a hard plastic handle cast directly onto the blade tang. A second layer of softer rubberised plastic with neatly molded checkering is overlaid for improved grip and comfort. They are being phased out, and replaced with the Companion line shown above. Some folks prefer the checkering pattern on the handle of the Clipper line.

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#840; The carbon steel Clipper has a 3 7/8" (100 mm) blade of unpolished carbon steel .079" thick. It has a solid plastic handle with a checkered black rubber coating in the center for improved grip. The handle is a bit smaller than the 731 shown above, and would work better for someone with smaller hands. It's supplied with a good quality plastic sheath with a belt hook that can be snapped over the belt. The knife and sheath weigh a bit over 3 1/2 ounces. $12.


Fishing Knives from Frosts

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#893; The fillet knives from Frosts have a different blade and grind. The stainless blades are tapered both from the back of the blade to the edge, and from the hilt to the point. The blades are .about 3 1/2" long and .050" at the thickest part. They taper to about .020" at the edge, where there is a small secondary bevel. This pattern is designed to move through the fish with minimum resistance. They would make excellent kitchen knives as well. The handles are the same as used on the Clipper series, with solid plastic covered with a textured rubber gripping surface. They have been replaced by the "Fishing Comfort" series shown below, which is based on the nearly identical Companion series.
$19 Closeout $17.50.


Fishing Knives from Mora of Sweden


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#11819: The Fishing Comfort 150 with scaler and EasyClean sheath. has a stiff blade about 5 3/4" long and .076" thick. The blade has a scaler on the spine. The handle is the same as the Companion series shown above, and comes with lime green trim. As the name implies, the sheath is made with alternating lattice openings, and is easy to rinse out. It can be swiveled to different positions, and has a retention clip to hold the knife securely. $28.

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#11817: The Fishing Comfort 155 with EasyClean sheath. has a semi-flexible flat ground blade about 6" long and .069" thick at the base. The handle is the same as the Companion series shown above, and comes with lime green trim. As the name implies, the sheath is made with alternating lattice openings, and is easy to rinse out. It can be swiveled to different positions, and has a retention clip to hold the knife securely. $28

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#11818: The Fishing Comfort 90 Fillet Knife has a short 3 3/8" semi-flexible blade, 050" thick at the base. Like most fillet knives, it comes with a flat ground blade. The handle is the same as the same as the Comfort series shown above. The blade is the same as the Craftline Flex knife shown above. I think the Craftline handle would provide a better grip when wet or slippery. Unless you just want the lime green trim, I think I'd go with the less expensive Flex. This one is $22.

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#11820: The Fishing Comfort 096 Scaler has narrow 3 3/4" blade with a scaler on the back. The blade is quite stiff and .078" thick. It has a Scandinavian grind, and wouldn't be bad as larger whittling knife. The handle is the same as the same as the Comfort series shown above. and it comes in the conventional sheath. $23.

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#54; The Fishing Classic #54 is a more traditional fishing knife. It comes with a stiff 5" blade .097" thick. There is a scaler on the spine of the blade. The wide tang runs about 2/3 the length of the hardwood handle. The handle is just over 5" long, and will fit a variety of hand sizes well. The sheath is of veg taned leather, and the belt loop can be swiveled for comfort when seated. $51.

Modern Mora Knives from KJ Eriksson

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Soft Grip Mora Knives
These modern Mora knives have cushioned rubber handles with integral guards. The grips are about 5" long, and work well with larger hands. They will provide good control and comfort even in the cold and wet. The sheaths are a semi-soft plastic that grip the knives securely.

Most of the sheaths in this group have belt slots intended for very thin belts. It seems the thick American style belt is not used in Europe. They also have a slot for fastening to a button, such as a coverall button. This is very tradtional in Scandinavia and modern coveralls as well as the folk costumes usually have a button for the purpose. It's easy enough to open up the slot if you prefer. The sheaths are thermoplastic, which means they get soft when warmed. If you warm the belt hanger and insert a piece of wood or even a ruler, it will keep the new shape when it cools. See the images.

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#711. This is an all-purpose belt knife with a 4" carbon steel blade .098" thick. I like the feel of these very much, and think they would make great hunting, camping or utility knives for those who do not insist on traditional materials. The knife and sheath weigh about 4 1/4 ounces. The handle is sized for average or slighlty larger hands. $11.

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#746. As above, with a 4" Sandvik stainless blade that really holds an edge. This would be excellent for canoeing! $14.


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#746-G; The same knife is available with a 4" stainless steel blade and military green handle and sheath for $15.


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#731. As above, with a longer 5 3/4" carbon steel blade .098" thick. $16.


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#748. As above, with a longer 5 3/4" stainless steel blade .098" thick. The knife and sheath weigh about 5 3/4 ounces. $18


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#749. As above, with an 8" stainless steel blade .079" thick. $25


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#510. The #510 is back! This was one of the top selling Mora knives in North America. Apparently it didn’t do as well in Sweden, because it was discontinued in favor of the #511 a few years ago. Now I’m very happy to see it back in production. Like the #511, the carbon steel blade is 3 ¾” long and .078” (2 mm) thick. The two millimeter thickness is thick enough to be useful, and thin enough to slice well. The back of the blade is left rough from the stamping. This will improve the sparking qualities when used with natural flint. For use with a ferro rod you may wish to square a portion of the back to produce sharp corners. The handle is sized for average or slightly smaller hands. It has a molded in pattern with a pebbled surface for excellent control with a variety of grips. The sheath has the usual button slot, but can be opened up take a narrow belt as indicated above. The knife weighs only 2 ¼ ounces, or 3 ¼ ounces in the sheath. This makes it very viable as a neck knife. The price is $12. This is more than the #511, but I'm told that it can't be assembled on the fully automated line as used for the #511.


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#511. I've started carrying these at the request of some of the outdoor schools. They have a hard red plastic handle, and a substantial guard. The handle is about 4 3/8" long, and sized for average and smaller hands. The carbon steel blade is just under 3 3/4" and .079" (2 mm) thick. The knife snaps securely in a hard plastic sheath. The weight with the sheath is about 3 1/2 ounces. The price is only $8.

#511-sheath; I have replacement sheaths for this knife priced at $2


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#546. I've started carrying these at the request of some of the outdoor schools. They have a hard plastic handle, and a substantial guard. The handle is about 4 3/8" long, and sized for average and smaller hands. The stainless steel blade is just under 3 3/4" and .079" (2 mm) thick. The knife snaps securely in a hard plastic sheath. The knife and sheath weigh about 3 1/2 ounces. The price is $10.50.

I think this would make an excellent knife for the deer hunter on a budget. I’m normally not a fan of finger guards, but they have a definite place when hunting large game. One of the tasks in dressing a large animal involves reaching into the body cavity to free the internal organs. If the point catches on a rib the knife can slide up in your hand with nasty results. A large finger guard helps prevent this. The Sandvik stainless blade is properly sized and shaped for the purpose, as well as for general camp chores. It will hold an exceptionally good edge. The handle is cast directly onto the tang, eliminating any gaps at the join to trap fluids and bacteria. The bright blue handle is easy to see when you lay it down. The stainless blade is easy to care for, and holds an excellent edge.

#511-sheath; I have replacement sheaths for this knife priced at $2


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#546-G; The same knife is available with a military green handle and sheath.. Again, the Sandvik stainless blade is just under 3 3/4" long and .079" thick. $12


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#2000. This is the Swedish version of a survival knife. It has a wide blade with a dramatic grind. The stainless blade is .098" thick and a bit over 4 1/2" long. The handle is also about 4 1/2". Handle and sheath are military green and gray plastic. The center portion of the handle is slightly soft, and has a textured surface for improved grip. The handle is sized for average to large sized hands. The weight of the knife and sheath is just under 5 ounces. $29.50.


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#12057; The same knife is now available in a really bright international orange color. You should be able to find this one when you lay it down. $29.50.


Modern Mora Knives from Frosts of Sweden


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#333; This is an even bigger knife designed for insulation work. It's about 18 1/2" with a 13” stainless steel blade. (The sides of the blade are left black from the heat treatment.) The blade is only .060” thick, and the knife weighs just over 7 ounces. It’s quite light for it’s size. It would be useful for all kinds of things besides insulation work, from butchering very large game to chopping light brush. It comes from the factory with the bur from the grinders left on the edge. I expect this is to give the edge some “tooth” when cutting insulation. You’ll probably want to remove the bur for more general uses. The blade is not polished, and may have some stains and scratches. It’s made for work, not display. There is no sheath. $30

Carving Knives


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Swedish Carving Techniques by Wille Sundqvist


It’s back in print!

I really like this book. It’s by far the best thing I’ve seen on the subject of traditional carving with knife and axe. There is no equal. It begins with the tools, and their selection and preparation. Different carving grips and strokes are discussed, so as to maximize control and effect, while minimizing the risk of injury from the sharp tools. There are sections on selecting wood from natural sources, (green wood is easier to carve), roughing out, finishing and decorating. The focus is on making useful objects, such as spoons and bowls that exhibit natural form, function and beauty. It’s been out of print for years, and I was very happy to have it again. Profusely illustrated, 135 pages in 8" x 10" paperback. List price, $24.95 $22.50

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Carving Swedish Woodenware, with Jögge Sundqvist is the companion video demonstrated by Willie’s son. Excellent! DVD format, 60 minutes, List price; $19.95 $18.00.

The book and video together are $35.00.


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#106. The basic Scandinavian carving knife from Frosts has a laminated blade with the core hardened to 61 - 62 on the Rockwell Scale. The narrow blade is about 3 1/8" (~80 mm) long. The unfinished birch wood handle is about 4 1/4" long (including the ferrule), and sized for average hands. It's supplied with a functional plastic sheath for $19


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#105; A carving knife from Frosts with an oversized handle. The handle is about 4 3/4" long, and is better shaped to protect the hand of those unused to Scandinavian knives. It would also give ample material for those wishing to carve their own style handle. The blade is 3 1/8" (79mm) long, and shaped for fine carving. The core of the laminated carbon blade is hardened to 61 - 62 on the Rockwell C scale for the finest of edges. No sheath is supplied, but the spare #511 sheaths listed elsewere for $2 are a tight, but workable fit. $19, or $20 with a #511 sheath. .


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#120; A traditional Scandinavian carving knife from Frosts. This is a detail knife with a blade of laminated carbon steel about 2 1/4" (58 mm) long and .107" thick. The core of the blade is hardened to 61 - 62 on the Rockwell C scale for the finest of edges. The handle is generously sized for a solid grip. $19


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#122; Another traditional carving knife, this time with a straight edge, and a very sharp point for cutting fine detail. The laminated carbon steel about 2 3/8" (60 mm) long and .112" thick. The core of the blade is hardened to 61 - 62 on the Rockwell C scale for the finest of edges. The 4 1/4" handle is generously sized for a solid grip. $19.


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#11488; "Wood Carving Basic" from Mora of Sweden. This is the newest in the line. The blade is 3" (78mm) long, 9/16" wide at the base, and .079" thick. Again, the blade is shaped for carving, but is high carbon steel, not laminated. It's supplied with a functional plastic sheath. $11.


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#73-164PS; This one is listed as a "Woodcarving knife for Children". It comes with a carbon steel blade just under 3" long, 5/8" wide, and .080" thick. There is a stamped metal guard to keep the child's fingers off the blade, and the 3 1/2" wood handle is sized for smaller hands. The knife comes with a plasitc sheath for $14


Specialty Carving Tools

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#162; Full curve carving knife, for carving bowls and spoons, etc. sharp on both sides, as well as the square end. Since it's sharp on both sides it works equally well with a left or right handed grip. $20


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#163: Half curve carving knife, as above, but with a more open curve. Since it's sharp on both sides it works equally well with a left or right handed grip. $20


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#164; Full curve carving knife by Frosts, sharp on one edge only, and tapered to a point. It only comes in one version, which is right handed for most people. $20


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#11728; (was #2006). This is a woodcarver's drawknife with a 4 3/8" blade. Smaller drawknives like this are quite handy, and are hard to find. Some years ago when I wanted one to shape a gunstock, I had to forge my own! $27.


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#220. This the Frosts version of the drawknife. The carbon steel blade is about 4 3/8" long and an inch wide. The handles have a slightly different shape to keep your hands centered. $27.


Farrier's Knives

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#188; This is a farrier's hoof knife, but it makes a good crooked knife for those who prefer the North American style of curved carving knife. The "No Stain" blade is about 3" long, and sharpened on both edges. The stout grip is a bit over 5". The blade comes with a coarse edge for hooves, and should be sharpened for use on wood. $ 17.

There is an interesting article on crooked knives posted by "Old Jimbo". I sometimes customize the handle of the hoof knife as well as reprofile the blade grind, but most folks don't bother.

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#180; The #180 has a single edge, which allows a longer bevel more suited to wood carving. The blade is a bit over 3", but only 2 1/8" is sharpened from the factory. I haven't had a chance to work one of these up yet, but it looks good to me They come in right and left handed versions.
#180-RH (right handed), $16.00.
#180-LH (left handed), $17.00.

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#330; This is a farrier's knife used for coarse trimming of hooves and other rough materials. The high carbon steel blade is about 5 1/2" long, with about 4" sharpened. It's about 1 1/8" wide and .097" thick. The rubberized handle is about 5 1/2" long. In old time woodworking shops, similar knives were called "hacking knives" and used for the roughest work. If you want a knife to stand up to serious batoning, this is it. It does not come with a sheath. $15.75


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The Eriksson Hand Axe

#1991; The Eriksson Hand Axe is a modern camping tool with traditional lines and functionality. The boron steel head is about 4 3/8" long and has a curved cutting edge of about 3 1/2". The plastic handle is cast directly onto the head. It's about 12 1/2" long and is shaped for a good grip even if you are wearing gloves or mits. The handle allows choking up on the head for skinning or use as an ulu. It weighs about 18 ounces, and comes with a leather sheath for $49

#12058; The axe is also available in bright orange as shown below. $49 (axe only).


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Morakniv® Outdoor Kit Orange

#12097; New from Mora is the hand axe and 2000 survival knife set in international orange. You shouldn't lose them in the snow! $75

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#11453; The Belly Opener; As the name implies, this is a specialized knife for opening the body cavity of large game animals. It's designed to avoid puncturing the internal organs, which can taint the meat. The stainless blade is about 2 3/8” long. The mouth of the opening is about ¾” wide, more than twice as wide as the usual “gut hook”. This helps prevent clogging when working with heavy pelted animals. The handle is just under 5” long, and shaped to provide good control even when wearing gloves. It’s cast directly onto the blade to avoid gaps that can collect bacteria causing body fluids. It’s supplied with a leather sheath that will accommodate belt up to about 1 1/8” wide. I’m not normally a fan of such specialized blades, but I’ve been asked for this one so here it is. $25

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Hunting Set 3000 Comfort in Hunter Orange

#12098; A hunting and butchering set of two knives and a sharpening steel. It's packaged in a briliant orange storage pouch with a hard plastic insert to protect the blades. The knives have an ergonomically designed handle with a patterned high-friction grip, finger protection and blades of swedish cold-rolled special stainless steel. Blade lengths are 146 and 158 mm (5 3/4" and 6 1/4"). The sharpening steel has a 7" hardened rod. $60.00

Kitchen Knives

I've been asked for Mora kitchen knives, so I'm starting with these.

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#4085; The Paring knife has a blade 3.3" long and only .071" thick at the base. The textured propylene handle is about 4 3/4" long. $18

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#4118; The Vegtable Knife has a narrow blade about 4 1/2" long and .071" thick at the base. I think this would be a good all around prep knife. $18.

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#3214 The Bread knife has a serated 8.4" blade angled so you can comfortably use it on a cutting block. The blade is about .055" thick. The handle has a soft overmold for increased comfort and improved grip. $39

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#4216; The Chef's knife has a 8.5" stainless blade about 1 7/8" wide and .096" thick at the base. The handle has a soft overmold for increased comfort and improved grip. $49

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#7250; The Butcher knife has a 9.8" blade, about .117" thick at the base. $39

Ordering

Shipping and handling is $6 per order (not per item) anywhere in the US. Standard shipping is by Priority Mail, so please give me your mailing address, not your UPS address. The $6 doesn't actually cover the cost in many cases, but it's easy to calculate, and is my way of saying "thank you".

Orders in New York State require sales tax. If you don't know the sales tax in your county, I can calculate it for you, but you should expect it to be added. This applies only to orders shipped to addresses within New York State.

I'm sorry, U.S. orders only please.

Most folks use a credit card and the encrypted secure order form. If you prefer, you can FAX your order to 716-731-3715. I'll need the type of card (Discover, Visa, or Master Charge), card number and expiration date. If course I'll also need to know what you are buying, and where to send it. Please include your e-mail address.

If you don't have a FAX, you can call 716-731-3715. If your timing is good, you can just speak to me and give me the order. If I'm not in the office it will default to the FAX machine. No collect calls.

If instant gratification is unavailable, you can always send a Postal Money Order or check to:

Ragweed Forge
PO Box 326
Sanborn, NY 14132

The Postal Snail may be slow, but he's faithful and discreet. Checks may be held for clearance, so if you're in a hurry, use a money order.

Everything on the page should be on hand and ready to ship. However some items may be short supply, so if you are ordering by mail, you might want to e-mail first so that I can hold your item (ragnar@ragweedforge.com).


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